Look at all the different names that coins go by!

When I picked up my first copy of the Guide Book of United States Coins Book by Richard S. Yeoman (this is also called the “red book”), I noticed that there were tons of names and nicknames that coins go by.

It really made my head spin—I had to stop and figure out what was what.  I realized that coins often get nicknames that are more popular than their real name.  Here’s some of the nicknames that you will hear:

Half eagle—this is another name for a United States $5 gold coin.

Eagle—this is a nickname for gold $10 coins that were made up until 1932.  The reason for the nickname is that the coin featured an eagle design on the back.

Trime—this is a nickname for the US three cent coin.  The US mint made this coin in the 1800s.

Double dime—this is a nickname for the 20-cent coin made by the United States mint during the mid-late 1800’s.

Iron dollar—this is a nickname for the US silver dollar from the 1800’s.  The phrase was primarily used in the northeastern portion of the United States, and this phrase was used by people who disliked carrying silver dollars due to their heavy weight.

Mercury dime—this nickname was for the US 10 cent piece that was made between 1916 and 1945.  Even though it was called the Winged Liberty Head dime at the beginning, the name “mercury” dime quickly caught on with the public when it was compared to the Roman god Mercury.

This is just some of the nicknames that you will hear.  Which ones have you heard?

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Reader’s help on this great pottery vase

Whenever you go out shopping, you will run across a wide variety of items.  It could be anything from furniture to enamel signs.  There will be times that you will run across something that is great—the only problem is is that you have no idea what the item is.

Not too long ago, this happened to me.  I picked this really cool vase up at a garage sale, and I instantly fell in love with it.

vase (1)

The problem that I have with it is that I have no idea who the artist is and what the pattern is called.  Is it a forest scene?  A forest scene at night time?  At the beach?  At a pond?  I really don’t know what this could be.

vase (2)

It’s also signed BR near the bottom of the vase.  The signature has really stumped me—could you possibly know who the artist is?

Do you know what this could be?  Any information on this beauty would be greatly appreciated!

What are some shopping tips for anyone who is new to the vintage scene?

When you first start to shop for vintage and collectible items, it can be intimidating.  What are some tips that can help you out?

One misconception is to get there early.  I know that you hear “get there early!” or “the early bird gets the worm”, but I can tell you that’s not always the case.  There have been plenty of times when I have found great items at 10am or even at 2 in the afternoon.

Look in the weird spots—you never know what you will find hiding in the bottom corner or the very top shelf of the booth.

Shop with someone.  It could be anyone—a friend, wife, husband or even a family member.  This will bring another set of eyes to the place that you are shopping.  I don’t know how many times I have walked by a booth and saw nothing and then a family member found something great where I was looking.  Not only that, they will also be on the look out for completely different items that you normally don’t go looking for.

Your shoe choice could come back and haunt you.  This might sound silly, but it really can.  I constantly see someone wearing a pair of stylish shoes that eventually start to hurt them.  At the very least, bring a pair of comfortable tennis shoes with you in case your feet start to hurt.

This is only a handful of the tips that will come in handy when you are shopping for vintage and collectible items.  What are some of the tips that you have run across?

What a great carnival glass plate from Fenton!

When the 1900’s rolled around, a new form of glassware was introduced.  Over the years, it has become to be known as Carnival Glass—and there is a wide variety of manufacturers, shapes and colors.

Carnival glass was at the height of its popularity in the 1920’s when Fenton produced this terrific 12-Sided Amethyst Footed Plate with the THREE FRUITS pattern.

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This terrific item is called a 12-sided plate because of the edge that it has—not only does it have a scalloped edge, it has 12 noticeable segments to it.

The THREE FRUITS pattern that is featured on this plate are cherries, pears, and apples.  Not only is the amethyst color great for just about any room, the pattern will also look great as well.

This great plate can be seen in my Etsy shop here.  What other great carnival glass items have you run across?