Sometimes directions help out with collecting paper money

Directions play a part in quite a few different ways in collecting, and this definitely includes collecting paper money from the early 1800’s.  During this time, it was up to the banks to produce paper money–they would file for a charter with the United States government, and this would allow the bank to produce their own paper money.

Collectors often look for paper money in a couple of ways for their collections.  They will look for a certain bank, city, or even state that the money was produced in.

If there was a major metropolitan area like Boston or Philadelphia, the more banks were likely to be there.  The east coast of the United States has quite a few different banks that offered paper money.  This was true going west to just past the Mississippi river.  The farther west you went, the fewer banks you would run into.

The gold rush in California that started in 1848 was what helped bring some banks (and eventually a United States mint in San Francisco) that far west.

When you travel up north (in places like North Dakota, Washington State, and even Alaska) they have very few banks at all.  There have been a few bills (collectors also call them “notes”) turn up for a few banks in these states, and are highly sought after.

You need to be careful when you are looking for paper money from the early 1800’s to add to your collection—there are quite a few outright counterfeit bills out there.  Not only that, there were also a lot of bills in circulation in the 1800’s that were counterfeit.  One reason was that there were many different designs that were made by the different banks out there making it harder for you to know if it was real or not when the bills were new.

Another reason is because there were a ton of banks that failed for one reason or another in the 1800’s (the money from these banks are also called “broken bank notes”).  There were lists for shut down banks and fake bills that circulated to merchants or vendors, but the lists were often out dated after a while.  It also took a while to get these lists circulated since mail had to go by stage coach, train or horse.

What fun direction can your collection go?

A few examples of the different types of advertising

Not too long ago, I ran across an old soap box from the 1940’s to the 1950’s and got to thinking about all the different forms of advertising that you can run across.  That box in question is for Kirk’s American Family White Flakes, and it was made by Proctor And Gamble.

soap box

The soap box can be seen in my Etsy store here.  What’s fun about that box is that it has a coupon on the box that has a value of 16 mills.  Mills were before my time, and I found out that a mill is worth one tenth of one cent (it takes 10 to make a cent, and they were used when sales tax is 1% of the price).

At that sale, I got to thinking about all the different forms of advertising, even the pieces that end up being fun (and useful) to have around.  One piece is this cast iron paperweight advertising EL RECO GAS.

EL RECO Gas Stations Figural Paperweight

The fun thing is that it actually looks like a gas station attendant.  Not only that, it still can be used today on any desk.  You can see it in my Etsy store here.

The last thing that came to mind was this small tin Prince Albert Tobacco advertising sign.

prince albert in a can!

Whenever I look at that sign, I think that it looks almost exactly like the side of the can.  You can see that sign in my Etsy sign here.

What kinds of different examples of advertising pieces have you run across?

Political collectibles of all sorts

In an election year, politics is one of our main topics of conversation.  Political buttons, banners, pins and even hats boasting the name of a current candidate are everywhere.

Collecting older political memorabilia is a fun way to remember our past—and you can find examples at many flea markets, antique stores, or even auctions.

I recently acquired a Frankoma Donkey mug from 1977 advertising the Carter and Mondale campaign.  It was a great find—even more so since we are in the middle of another political season.

frankoma

You can see this terrific mug in my Etsy shop here.  Another area that you can run across are paper related items.

paper political

This could be photographs, invitations to an event, or even a print of a famous painting.  I have a lot like this on eBay, which you can see here.

What kinds of political items have you run across?