ITEM HIGHLIGHT: 1920’s Trident Water Meter by the Neptune Water Meter Company

While I was shopping one day, I happened to see this item.  At first, I didn’t even know what it was—it was so cool that I had to check it out. 

I started looking at it and my mind was blown—and then I saw what the lid had to say.  I saw that the lid states it is the Trident Water Meter by the Neptune Meter Company!

The meter has the original folding cover or lid that covers a white gauge with black lettering, and the gauge reads 10 GALLONS at the bottom.

 The meter is made of either cast iron or brass (the meter has been painted a light blue at some point).  It dates to about the 1920’s and it has very little wear.  An interesting point about this is that the meter is pretty tall at 6 ½ inches—I think that it was being used somewhere like a basement of a house at some point.

Not only is it an interesting conversation piece, but it would also be a fun addition to any mancave or desk.

You can see this terrific item in my Etsy shop here, head on over and check it out!

Item Highlight: multi color slag glass gear shifter knob from the 1920’s to 1930’s

Ever since cars have been made, people have been adding their own personal touches to them somehow some way.  It has been known to be a wide variety of items from a fancy hood ornament or even a different radio.

One of the items that people have changed over the years is the gear shifter knob.  This has also been found on the cars from the 1920’s to the 1930’s, and one of the knobs that has been used is this really cool glass gear shifter knob.

As you can see, it was made out of slag glass that has a swirl pattern to it, and it has multiple colors to it.  With cream, tan, yellow, brown and even white colors, it also has a flat top and tapered sides to it.

You know what is great about it?  All you need to do is to unscrew the old gear shifter knob and screw this one on (you may need to rethread the threads on this example—they don’t look very straight to me).

This great Art Deco knob would look terrific in someone’s rat rod or Ford Model A Roadster, and it would be a fun paperweight either in a garage or on a desk.

You will be able to see the slag glass gear shifter knob in my shop on Etsy here.  Head on over and check it out!

Wow, what an interesting beer can!

The aluminum beer can made it’s debut in the late 1950’s and was introduced by the Hawaii Brewing Company.  Since then, pretty much every brewing company has caught on and started to use them.  Coors, Pabst Blue Ribbon and even Budweiser are some of the products that have been packed into this type of can.

Did you know that there have been errors along the way?  Upside down labels and the lid missing the pop top are common errors, and I bet that I can produce an error that you have never seen—the label on the inside of the can!

As you can kind of see in the picture is that this is a Pabst Blue Ribbon can.  When this can was made, there was a production error that caused the label to be on the inside of the can.

You can also see that there is no damage anywhere to the can, and it can still hold liquid.  The crazy thing about this can is that it is the same size and holds the normal 12 ounces.

You can see this can in my Etsy shop here, head on over and check it out.

I have personally never seen an error like this.  Have you ever run across one similar?

Does that dresser box look like a . . . duck?!?

Occasionally, you will run across an item that will make you do a double take.  That is what I did when I ran across this dresser box.

When I first saw this dresser box, I didn’t think it was in fact a dresser box.  Being in the shape of a duck, I thought that it was just a sculpture for someone to put on a bookshelf or even their desk.

I quickly realized that it was a dresser box when I picked it up.  When I did, the duck also surprised me that it was made of pewter—I thought that it was pottery with a silver glaze.

The duck was made in about the 1950’s in Hong Kong and has a really cool stamped motif on the body of it.  Not only that, but the eyes of the duck are also made of brass.

You can see this cool duck in my shop on Etsy here.  Head on over and check it out!

Wow, this bowl really helps keep food warm?

Over Time, there have been plenty of items that have fallen out of favor for one reason or another.  It could be a different type of record player, radio or even a Television.

Take this child’s bowl that has been designed with a built-in container to hold hot water to keep the food stored in it warm.

It is still very functional, but with the advancements of electricity and the invention of hot plates or warmers (or even microwave ovens, for that matter) it has become easier to keep your kids food warm for them.

The bowl has a built-in spout with a removable lid so you can get the water in and out without having a problem.

All that you have to do is to pour some water into the spout and seal it up.  After that, you are good to go.  The bowl is kind of like the travel mugs that we have around today.

What kinds of items like this that have fallen out of favor have you run into?

Wisdom Lane Antiques Item Highlight: Scenes Of Washington DC Souvenir Tumbler

The latest item highlight from Wisdom Lane Antiques is this terrific silverplate souvenir tumbler.

The tumbler features several terrific scenes of Washington DC, and two of the scenes on it are The White House and Mount Vernon.

It is also dated May 7, 1901 on the bottom of the tumbler.  Not only that, the tumbler is also marked GERMANY.

This terrific souvenir tumbler can be seen in my shop on Etsy here.  Head on over and check it out!

A little history of a Victorian red tomato server

During the Victorian era, you could find a serving piece for just about anything.  Olive forks? Got it.  Cake servers?  Yep, got that too.  But have you ever run across a red tomato server?

These items are great.  Tomato servers come in two different variations, one for red tomatoes and one for green.  Why in the world would you have a different one for each type of tomatoes?  Its simple really when you think about it.  The red tomato servers have the openings built in for all of the juice from the tomato to drain through the server and not onto your tablecloth.

The server for the green tomatoes does not have the openings for the fact that the green tomatoes are not as messy and don’t need the openings.  You could even use the green tomato server for fried green tomatoes.

Currently in my Etsy shop, there is a red tomato server that was made by the William Rogers Company.  Its made of silverplate and sports the LA FRANCE pattern.  You can see the piece here.

The Victorian era truly did make a ide variety of serving pieces for the table.  What items have you run across while shopping?

Wow, what a massive cologne bottle store display!

I can see it now—as you are walking through a store in a local mall, you pass by the perfume counter and you see this sitting on the counter.  It really makes you stop and takes notice.

What is it?  It’s an advertising piece for ESCADA SENTIMENT men’s cologne.  This store display is in the shape of a massive cologne bottle.

This bottle is made of glass and it has a plastic lid and atomizer. Both the lid and atomizer are removable, and the store display has the same artistic / triangular shape as the normal bottle.

Just how big is this?  The store display measures 14 ¾ inches tall including the lid and 5 inches at the base.

You can see this terrific find in my Etsy store here.

Wow, what a great store display!  Have you seen anything like this before?

A lesson learned on reproductions

While shopping at one of the local antique malls in my area, I happened onto something that could be a very good thing. It happened to be an R S Suhl shaker, or even possibly hat pin holder.

With the price being right, and some wear being present on the bottom of the shaker, I went ahead and bought it.  When I went to find out what I could about the mark (so I could list it online), there was a little voice in the back of my head that was saying that something was not right.

And then I found a shaker just like the one that I have.  I was thrilled!  I started to read what was posted online about it, and sure enough, that little voice I was hearing was right.  The thing was a reproduction and possibly even an outright fake.

The lesson I learned?  A little research and knowledge can go a long way in the long run.

HELP! What was this plaque used for?

Several years ago, I picked up this brown and white enamel plaque that has a portrait of a woman on it.  When I purchased it, I was told by the dealer that it was a decoration off of the front of a stove that was made around the late 1800’s to the early 1900’s.

The dealer also said that they thought it was enameled copper.

Ever since the day I got it, I have been poking around to see what exactly it is.  The first thing that I ran across was a picture of Queen Elizabeth during her Diamond Jubilee of 1897.  The picture was pretty close to the image on the front of the plaque.

Another thing that really threw me for a loop was that I saw another listing on the internet that said these plaques were used on a front door of a house.

Bottom of front Is it really a decoration for a stove or a door?  Was it really made of copper?  If it was off of a stove, what brand was it on?  If you know what this is, feel free to drop me a line.  I would love to know is what this was used for.